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Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

3 edition of Contribution of spectral cues to directional hearing found in the catalog.

Contribution of spectral cues to directional hearing

Alan D. Musicant

Contribution of spectral cues to directional hearing

by Alan D. Musicant

  • 380 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Alan D. Musicant.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMicrofilm 82/160 (Q)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationviii, 135 leaves
Number of Pages135
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3132813M
LC Control Number82246695

Research in spatial hearing has evolved from a theoretical discipline studying the basic mechanisms of hearing to a technical discipline focused on designing and implementing increasingly sophisticated spatial auditory display systems. This book contains 39 chapters representing the current state-of-the-art in spatial audio research selected. Radical advancements in hearing technology in the last 30 years have offered some deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children the adequate auditory access necessary to acquire spoken language with high-quality early intervention. However, meaningful achievement gaps in reading and spoken language persist despite the engineering marvel of modern hearing aids and cochlear by: 1.

Gender identification in younger and older adults: Use of spectral and temporal cues in noise-vocoded speech Schvartz, K. C. & Chatterjee, M., May 1 , In: Ear and hearing. 33, 3, p. 10 p. Speech perception in noise using directional microphones in open-canal hearing aids Klemp, E. J. & Dhar, S., Dec 1 , In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology. 19, 7, p. 8 p. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article.

Hearing Aids, Second Edition, is a book within a book: Each chapter has a one-page synopsis that captures the key concepts of each topic The material that students most need is contained in marked paragraphs that flow after each other to form a coherent thin book inside the larger book Intervening additional paragraphs add satisfying depth.   2. Listening to speech in noise. To return to Cherry's cocktail party: Plomp () has calculated that when everyone at a well-attended party talks at the same level, the speech of the attended talker at a distance of m has a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of approximately 0 dB—the background is as intense as the target talker. Since speech fluctuates substantially in level, an average of Cited by:


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Contribution of spectral cues to directional hearing by Alan D. Musicant Download PDF EPUB FB2

The contribution of spectral cues to human sound localization was investigated by removing cues in 1/2- 1- or 2-octave bands in the frequency range above 4 kHz. The contribution of spectral cues to human sound localization was investigated by removing cues in 1 2- 1- or 2-octave bands in the frequency range above 4 zation responses were given by placing an acoustic pointer at the same apparent position as a virtual by: The contribution of spectral cues to human sound localization was investigated by removing cues in 1/2- 1- or 2-octave bands in the frequency range above 4 kHz.

Jos J. Eggermont, in Hearing Loss, Single-Sided Deafness. BCIs are often used as a “Contralateral Routing of Signals” device, which improve directional hearing in single-sided deafness (SSD).

Agterberg et al. () examined sound localization in azimuth in patients with acquired severe unilateral conductive hearing loss. All patients were fitted with a BAHA to restore. Individual sensitivity to spectral and temporal cues in listeners with hearing impairment.

Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 58(2), – PubMed PubMedCentral CrossRef Google ScholarAuthor: Pamela Souza. The virtual auditory space technique was used to quantify the relative strengths of interaural time difference (ITD), interaural level difference (ILD), and spectral cues in determining the perceived lateral angle of wideband, low-pass, and high-pass noise bursts.

Listeners reported the apparent locations of virtual targets that were presented over headphones and filtered with listeners’ own Cited by: Contribution of spectral pinna cues for sound localization in children with congenital unilateral conductive hearing loss after hearing rehabilitation  Book (monograph) Single-sided deafness and directional hearing: contribution of spectral cues and high-frequency hearing loss in the hearing ear  Agterberg.

The spectral cues encoded in the pressure spectra at ears, which are caused by the scattering, diffraction, and reflection of anatomical structures. In particular, the pinna-caused high-frequency spectral cue above 5 to 6 kHz is crucial to front-back disambiguity and vertical by: Janko J, Anderson T, Gilkey R () Using neural networks to evaluate the viability of monaural and interaural cues for sound localization.

In: Gilkey RH, Anderson T (eds), Binaural and Spatial Hearing in Real and Virtual Enviornments. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Google ScholarCited by: Single-sided deafness and directional hearing: contribution of spectral cues and high-frequency hearing loss in the hearing ear.

Front Neurosci ; 8: ; 18 Rothpletz AM, Wightman FL, Kistler DJ. Informational masking and spatial hearing in listeners with and without unilateral hearing loss. J Speech Lang Hear Res ; 55 (02) Author: Hillary A Snapp.

Physical properties of source signals regarding sound localization in a hall. According to the reports by Morimoto [] regarding the influences of sound localization of spatial perception in a hall, the reverberation energy (RT60 =s) may be treated as the first reflection energy (delay time = 80, ms).However, the selection of music is exclusively limited to using Wolfgang Author: Chiung Yao Chen.

In nature, sounds of interest arrive at the eardrums accompanied by echoes that reflect off of surfaces. This superposition can distort the cues by which we localize the source of a sound.

Yet, we seem to have no difficulty turning precisely toward the source even in the presence of moderately intense echoes. The article by Devore and colleagues in this issue of Neuron suggests that the Cited by: 1.

Single-sided deafness and directional hearing: contribution of spectral cues and high-frequency hearing loss in the hearing ear. Frontiers in Neuroscience 8: doi: /fnins (). Temporal envelope (ENV) and temporal fine structure (TFS) are changes in the amplitude and frequency of sound perceived by humans over time.

These temporal changes are responsible for several aspects of auditory perception, including loudness, pitch and timbre perception and spatial hearing.

Complex sounds such as speech or music are decomposed by the peripheral auditory system of humans into. The ability of cochlear implant users to use temporal envelope cues recovered from speech frequency modulation, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, (2), J.H.

Won, K. Nie, W.R. Drennan, E.M. Jameyson, and J.T. Rubinstein, Maximizing the spectral and temporal benefits of two clinically used sound processing strategies for. Sound Localization by Human Listeners Sound Localization by Human Listeners Middlebrooks, John C.; Green, David M.

The task of localizing a sound source presents a challenge to the integrative capabilities of the nervous system. In the visual system, locations of objects in the visual world are focused by the optics of the eye directly onto the retina, /91/ To move beyond requiring extensive study of each sound source and each area in which it may be operated, [NRC () recommended that] a coordinated plan should be developed to explore how sound characteristics affect the responses of a representative set of marine mammal species in several biological contexts (e.g., feeding, migrating, and breeding).

DCN neurons may represent the beginning of a pathway that is sensitive to spectral directional cues. Spectral notches are salient features of the HRTF. Discharge rates of some DCN neurons are inhibited when the center frequency of a spectral notch coincides with the neuron's best frequency (Joris ; Nelken and Young ; Spirou and Young.

A system and method for processing an acoustic input signal and providing at least one output acoustic signal to a user of a hearing-aid system. The hearing-aid system includes first and second channels with one of the channels having an adaptive delay. The first channel includes a directional unit for receiving the acoustic input signal and providing a directional signal; a correlative unit Cited by:   Bats produce loud calls and listen to the returning echoes to find their way around.

This process, known as echolocation, is sometimes described as 'seeing with sound'. The way bats perceive the world through echolocation, however, is fundamentally different from how we experience it through vision.

Echolocation provides much less information about the world than vision does, but despite this Cited by:. Spatial hearing is dependent on the processing of monaural and binaural hearing cues (Figure 1A,B). While monaural spectral-shape cues provide important information regarding elevation and contribute to our ability to determine the distance of a sound source, binaural hearing cues play a much larger role in spatial hearing abilities (Figure 1D.This banner text can have markup.

web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation.Contribution of proximal sound level (acoustic head–shadow) and target azimuth to perceived sound–source azimuth in control listeners (C,D) and BCD users (A,B).

Two conditions are shown: device on (open symbols) or off (gray symbols) for the BCD users, and normal binaural hearing (open) versus monaural plugging (gray) in the controls.